Paris, September 8th 1839 – 1888, Paris

Raised in an artistic environment, Camille Léopold Cabaillot-Lassalle quickly followed in the footsteps of his father and teacher, Louis-Simon Cabaillot-Lassalle (1810-1870) and arrived at Ecouen in 1878. Cabaillot-Lassalle was also a student of, and strongly influenced by, the charismatic Pierre Edouard Frère (1819-1886).

From 1868 until his death, Cabaillot-Lassalle exhibited numerous times at the Paris Salons. The piece that made him famous was “Le salon de 1874”, shown during the 1874 Paris Salon exhibition, depicting visitors in the Salon admiring actual pieces of art by famous artists that Cabaillot-Lassalle reproduced on a reduced scale. These artists were very well known, such as Henriette Browne (1859-1901), Jean-Baptiste Corot (1796-1875), Jules Jacques Veyrassat (1828-1893), Léon Richet (1843-1907) an Gustave Achille Guillaumet (1840-1887), all of whom agreed to be included in Cabaillot-Lassalle’s whimsical piece. The painting, recently auction for 100,000 Euros, is both imaginative and charming and draws attention and admiration to the present day.

Camille Cabaillot-Lassalle often painted “everyday life” scenes recounting the lives of middle class women of the Second Empire, as for example in his 1874 painting: “La femme se regardant dans un Miroir” (“The Woman Looking at Herself in a Mirror”). Far from chronicling the lives of working country-women and housewives as was common for other artists of the Ecouen School, Camille Cabaillot portrayed non-working women looking after their attire and beauty, or showing themselves in the most elegant manner in various settings such as church, the museum, shopping, or garden.
He died in Paris, where he resided.

For further information, please read the book “L’Ecole d’Ecouen, une colonie de peintres au XIXéme siècle”, unfortunately only available in French for the time being (but we are working on it).